Multi-omic profiling reveals associations between the gut mucosal microbiome, the metabolome, and host DNA methylation associated gene expression in patients with colorectal cancer

Wang, Qing and Ye, Jianzhong and Fang, Daiqiong and Lv, Longxian and Wu, Wenrui and Shi, Ding and Li, Yating and Yang, Liya and Bian, Xiaoyuan and Wu, Jingjing and Jiang, Xianwan and Wang, Kaicen and Wang, Qiangqiang and Hodson, Mark P. and Thibaut, Loïc M. and Ho, Joshua W. K. and Giannoulatou, Eleni and Li, Lanjuan (2020) Multi-omic profiling reveals associations between the gut mucosal microbiome, the metabolome, and host DNA methylation associated gene expression in patients with colorectal cancer. BMC Microbiology, 20 (S1). p. 83. ISSN 1471-2180

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Link to published document: http://doi.org/10.1186/s12866-020-01762-2

Abstract

Background: The human gut microbiome plays a critical role in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, a comprehensive analysis of the interaction between the host and microbiome is still lacking. Results: We found correlations between the change in abundance of microbial taxa, butyrate-related colonic metabolites, and methylation-associated host gene expression in colonic tumour mucosa tissues compared with the adjacent normal mucosa tissues. The increase of genus Fusobacterium abundance was correlated with a decrease in the level of 4-hydroxybutyric acid (4-HB) and expression of immune-related peptidase inhibitor 16 (PI16), Fc Receptor Like A (FCRLA) and Lymphocyte Specific Protein 1 (LSP1). The decrease in the abundance of another potentially 4-HB-associated genus, Prevotella 2, was also found to be correlated with the down-regulated expression of metallothionein 1 M (MT1M). Additionally, the increase of glutamic acid-related family Halomonadaceae was correlated with the decreased expression of reelin (RELN). The decreased abundance of genus Paeniclostridium and genus Enterococcus were correlated with increased lactic acid level, and were also linked to the expression change of Phospholipase C Beta 1 (PLCB1) and Immunoglobulin Superfamily Member 9 (IGSF9) respectively. Interestingly, 4-HB, glutamic acid and lactic acid are all butyrate precursors, which may modify gene expression by epigenetic regulation such as DNA methylation. Conclusions: Our study identified associations between previously reported CRC-related microbial taxa, butyrate-related metabolites and DNA methylation-associated gene expression in tumour and normal colonic mucosa tissues from CRC patients, which uncovered a possible mechanism of the role of microbiome in the carcinogenesis of CRC. In addition, these findings offer insight into potential new biomarkers, therapeutic and/or prevention strategies for CRC.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Depositing User: Repository Administrator
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2020 00:55
Last Modified: 28 Oct 2021 02:35
URI: http://eprints.victorchang.edu.au/id/eprint/961

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