Amyloid Cardiomyopathy

Bart, Nicole K. and Thomas, Liza and Korczyk, Dariusz and Atherton, John J. and Stewart, Graeme J. and Fatkin, Diane (2020) Amyloid Cardiomyopathy. Heart, Lung and Circulation. ISSN 14439506

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Link to published document: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2019.11.019

Abstract

Amyloid cardiomyopathy is emerging as an important and under-recognised cause of heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias, especially in older adults. This disorder is characterised by extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils that form due to misfolding of secreted light chains (AL) or transthyretin protein (ATTR). In ATTR, amyloid aggregates typically result from excessive accumulation of wild-type transthyretin (ATTRwt) or from protein structural defects caused by TTR gene variants (ATTRv). Amyloid fibril deposition may predominantly affect the heart or show multi-system involvement. Previously considered to be rare and inexorably progressive with no specific therapy, there has been enormous recent interest in ATTR cardiomyopathy due to upwardly-revised estimates of disease prevalence together with development of disease-modifying interventions. Because of this, there is a clinical imperative to have a high index of suspicion to identify potential cases and to be aware of contemporary diagnostic methods and treatment options. Genetic testing should be offered to all patients with proven ATTR to access the benefits of new therapies specific to ATTRv and allow predictive testing of family members. With heightened awareness of amyloid cardiomyopathy and expanded use of genetic testing, a substantial rise in the numbers of asymptomatic individuals who are carriers of pathogenic variants is expected, and optimal strategies for monitoring and treatment of these individuals at risk need to be determined. Pre-emptive administration of fibril-modifying therapies provides an unprecedented opportunity for disease prevention and promises to change amyloid cardiomyopathy from being a fatal to a treatable disorder.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Depositing User: Repository Administrator
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2020 23:27
Last Modified: 31 Aug 2021 03:47
URI: http://eprints.victorchang.edu.au/id/eprint/927

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