Elucidating the role of the L-type calcium channel in excitability and energetics in the heart: The ISHR 2020 Research Achievement Award Lecture

Hool, Livia C. (2022) Elucidating the role of the L-type calcium channel in excitability and energetics in the heart: The ISHR 2020 Research Achievement Award Lecture. Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, 172. pp.100-108. ISSN 00222828

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Link to published document: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.yjmcc.2022.08.001

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading health burden worldwide and with the rising rates in obesity and type II diabetes and ongoing effects of long COVID, it is anticipated that the burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality will increase. Calcium is essential to cardiac excitation and contraction. The main route for Ca(2+) influx is the L-type Ca(2+) channel (Ca(v)1.2) and embryos that are homozygous null for the Ca(v)1.2 gene are lethal at day 14 postcoitum. Acute changes in Ca(2+) influx through the channel contribute to arrhythmia and sudden death, and chronic increases in intracellular Ca(2+) contribute to pathological hypertrophy and heart failure. We use a multidisciplinary approach to study the regulation of the channel from the molecular level through to in vivo CRISPR mutant animal models. Here we describe some examples of our work from over 2 decades studying the role of the channel under physiological and pathological conditions. Our single channel analysis of purified human Ca(v)1.2 protein in proteoliposomes has contributed to understanding direct molecular regulation of the channel including identifying the critical serine involved in the "fight or flight" response. Using the same approach we identified the cysteine responsible for altered function during oxidative stress. Chronic activation of the L-type Ca(2+) channel during oxidative stress occurs as a result of persistent glutathionylation of the channel that contributes to the development of hypertrophy. We describe for the first time that activation of the channel alters mitochondrial function (and energetics) on a beat-to-beat basis via movement of cytoskeletal proteins. In translational studies we have used this response to "report" mitochondrial function in models of cardiomyopathy and to test efficacy of novel therapies to prevent cardiomyopathy.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Depositing User: Repository Administrator
Date Deposited: 02 Mar 2023 01:23
Last Modified: 02 Mar 2023 01:23
URI: http://eprints.victorchang.edu.au/id/eprint/1305

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