Clinician Estimates of Frailty Compared to Formal Frailty Assessment in Adults With Heart Failure: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

McDonagh, Julee and Prichard, Roslyn and Ferguson, Caleb and Phillips, Jane L. and Davidson, Patricia M. and Macdonald, Peter S. and Newton, Phillip J. (2022) Clinician Estimates of Frailty Compared to Formal Frailty Assessment in Adults With Heart Failure: A Cross-Sectional Analysis. Heart, Lung and Circulation, 31 (9). pp.1241-1246. ISSN 14439506

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Link to published document: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2022.04.003

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Frailty assessment is recommended for patients with heart failure. Despite the availability of instruments to assess frailty, there are no clear recommendations regarding the optimal instrument to use in a heart failure context. This ambiguity combined with a lack of education and resources, often leads clinicians to rely on subjective estimates of frailty, such as 'the end-of-the-bed' or 'eyeball' test. AIM: To examine the association between clinician-estimated frailty and formal frailty assessment in adults with heart failure. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of the FRAilty MEasurement in Heart Failure (FRAME-HF) study. PARTICIPANTS: (1) Adults aged >/=18 years in the outpatient heart failure clinic and cardiology ward; (2) and cardiovascular clinicians (nurses, physicians, and allied-health professionals). Following participant recruitment, cardiovascular clinicians were asked to rate the participant's frailty status based on their routine clinical assessment as either: frail, pre-frail, or non-frail, which was then compared to a formal frailty assessment using a modified version of the Frailty Phenotype. The association between clinician-estimated frailty and formal frailty assessment were examined using a weighted Kappa statistic and Spearman's correlation coefficient. RESULTS: A total of 75 patients and 39 clinicians were recruited, producing 194 paired frailty assessments. Mean age of the patients was 54 (+/-13) years. Correlation of pooled clinician-estimated frailty to formal frailty was fair (0.52, p=0.00). Correlation was highest between allied-health estimated frailty and formal frailty (0.70, p=0.00). Agreement between pooled clinician-estimated frailty and formal frailty was fair (0.33) and was highest between allied health-estimated frailty and formal frailty (0.45). CONCLUSION: Subjective clinician-estimated frailty is not a reliable replacement for formal frailty assessment in adults with heart failure, underscoring the need for assessment using a valid and reliable instrument.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Depositing User: Repository Administrator
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2023 01:25
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2023 01:25
URI: http://eprints.victorchang.edu.au/id/eprint/1289

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