Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Young, Socioeconomically Vulnerable Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black Adults

Iglesies-Grau, Josep and Fernandez-Jimenez, Rodrigo and Diaz-Munoz, Raquel and Jaslow, Risa and de Cos-Gandoy, Amaya and Santos-Beneit, Gloria and Hill, Christopher A. and Turco, Alexandra and Kadian-Dodov, Daniella and Kovacic, Jason C. and Fayad, Zahi A. and Fuster, Valentin (2022) Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Young, Socioeconomically Vulnerable Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black Adults. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 80 (3). pp.219-229. ISSN 07351097

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Link to published document: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2022.04.054

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Non-Hispanic Black persons are at greater risk of cardiovascular (CV) events than other racial/ethnic groups; however, their differential vulnerability to early subclinical atherosclerosis is poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: This work aims to study the impact of race/ethnicity on early subclinical atherosclerosis in young socioeconomically disadvantaged adults. METHODS: Bilateral carotid and femoral 3-dimensional vascular ultrasound examinations were performed on 436 adults (parents/caregivers and staff) with a mean age of 38.0 +/- 11.1 years, 82.3% female, 66% self-reported as Hispanic, 34% self-reported as non-Hispanic Black, and no history of CV disease recruited in the FAMILIA (Family-Based Approach in a Minority Community Integrating Systems-Biology for Promotion of Health) trial from 15 Head Start preschools in Harlem (neighborhood in New York, New York, USA). The 10-year Framingham CV risk score was calculated, and the relationship between race/ethnicity and the presence and extent of subclinical atherosclerosis was analyzed with multivariable logistic and linear regression models. RESULTS: The mean 10-year Framingham CV risk was 4.0%, with no differences by racial/ethnic category. The overall prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis was significantly higher in the non-Hispanic Black (12.9%) than in the Hispanic subpopulation (6.6%). After adjusting for 10-year Framingham CV risk score, body mass index, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and employment status, non-Hispanic Black individuals were more likely than Hispanic individuals to have subclinical atherosclerosis (OR: 3.45; 95% CI: 1.44-8.29; P = 0.006) and multiterritorial disease (P = 0.026). CONCLUSIONS: After adjustment for classic CV risk, lifestyle, and socioeconomic factors, non-Hispanic Black younger adults seem more vulnerable to early subclinical atherosclerosis than their Hispanic peers, suggesting that the existence of emerging or undiscovered CV factors underlying the residual excess risk (Family-Based Approach in a Minority Community Integrating Systems-Biology for Promotion of Health [FAMILIA (Project 2)]; NCT02481401).

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Depositing User: Repository Administrator
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2023 01:20
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2023 01:20
URI: http://eprints.victorchang.edu.au/id/eprint/1286

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