Female Gender Is Associated with Higher Susceptibility of Weight Induced Arterial Stiffening and Rise in Blood Pressure

Zuo, Junli and Chao, Huijuan and Tang, Biwen and Avolio, Alberto P. and Schlaich, Markus P. and Nolde, Janis Marc and Adji, Audrey and Carnagarin, Revathy (2021) Female Gender Is Associated with Higher Susceptibility of Weight Induced Arterial Stiffening and Rise in Blood Pressure. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 10 (16). p. 3479. ISSN 2077-0383

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Link to published document: http://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10163479

Abstract

Arterial stiffness is an important predictor of cardiovascular events, independent of traditional risk factors. Stiffening of arteries, though an adaptive process to hemodynamic load, results in substantial increase in the pulsatile hemodynamic forces that detrimentally affects the microcirculation perfusing the vital organs such as the brain, heart and kidneys. Studies have proposed that arterial stiffness precedes and may contribute to the development of hypertension in individuals with obesity. Our study sought to determine the gender-based effects on arterial stiffening in obesity which may predispose to the development of hypertension. We found female sex is associated with higher susceptibility of weight-related arterial stiffening and rise in blood pressure in obesity. Women had significantly higher carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV) with higher body mass index (BMI) status (normal: 7.9 +/- 2 m/s; overweight: 9.1 +/- 2 m/s; obese: 9 +/- 2 m/s, p < 0.001), whereas it was similar in males across all BMI categories. The linear association between arterial stiffness and BMI following adjustment for age and brachial systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), remained significant in females (beta = 0.06; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.1; p < 0.05) but not in males (beta = 0.04; 95% CI -0.01 to 0.1; p > 0.05). The mean CF-PWV values increased by 0.1 m/s for every 1 kg/m(2) increase in BMI in the female subjects in the age adjusted linear model, while such effect was not seen in the male subjects. In line with arterial stiffening, the overweight and obese females demonstrated significantly higher systolic brachial BP. (BP difference: DeltaBP 9-11 mmHg, p < 0.01) and central systolic pressure (DeltaBP 8-10 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to their lean counterparts, unlike the male subjects. Our results suggest that female gender is associated with higher susceptibility of weight-related arterial stiffening and rise in blood pressure.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Depositing User: Repository Administrator
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2021 02:48
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2021 02:48
URI: http://eprints.victorchang.edu.au/id/eprint/1126

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